Sub-Saharan African Journal of Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 37--42

Perceptions and practices related to health hazards of patronizing traditional nail cutters and barbers among market men in Samaru – North Western Nigeria


Aisha A Abubakar1, Ibrahim A Dangana2, Babajide A John3, Abdulrazak A Gobir1, Mohammed S Ibrahim1, Ahmed A Umar1, Suleiman S Bashir1, Adamu U Shehu1 
1 Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
2 Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria
3 Faculty of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Aisha A Abubakar
Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria
Nigeria

Introduction: Several health hazards including infectious blood-borne communicable diseases and skin conditions are associated with traditional nail cutting and barbering. Negligence and accidents during the use of sharp instruments such as nail cutters, razors, shaving blades and clippers may be risk factors for blood-borne infections such as Hepatitis B virus (HBV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Human Immune-deficiency Virus (HIV), causing serious health problems. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were administered to 231 market men in Samaru, Zaria. Data collected were coded and analyzed with IBM SPSS 20.0. Results: Of 231 sampled men, 223 (96.5%) were aware of HIV infection and mentioned sexual contact as its main mode of transmission. Similarly, 220 (95.2%) knew HIV could also be transmitted through contaminated barbering and nail cutting instruments. Majority 146 (63.2%) had no knowledge of HBV and HCV infections and did not know they are health hazards associated with nail cutting and barbing. Most 196 (84.8%) think barbers and nail cutters should sterilize their instruments. Personal risk perception and knowledge scores were majorly fair for HIV (45.5%) and poor for HBV and HCV (78.4%). Conclusion: Knowledge of market men in Samaru-Zaria about HIV was found to be higher than that of HBV and HCV infections. They have poor knowledge about HBV and HCV and their transmission. Majority have good perceptions and fair practices towards health hazards associated with barbering and nail cutting. Health authorities must carry out more health education and sensitization on HBV and HCV among market men (traders).


How to cite this article:
Abubakar AA, Dangana IA, John BA, Gobir AA, Ibrahim MS, Umar AA, Bashir SS, Shehu AU. Perceptions and practices related to health hazards of patronizing traditional nail cutters and barbers among market men in Samaru – North Western Nigeria.Sub-Saharan Afr J Med 2017;4:37-42


How to cite this URL:
Abubakar AA, Dangana IA, John BA, Gobir AA, Ibrahim MS, Umar AA, Bashir SS, Shehu AU. Perceptions and practices related to health hazards of patronizing traditional nail cutters and barbers among market men in Samaru – North Western Nigeria. Sub-Saharan Afr J Med [serial online] 2017 [cited 2022 May 26 ];4:37-42
Available from: https://www.ssajm.org/article.asp?issn=2384-5147;year=2017;volume=4;issue=2;spage=37;epage=42;aulast=Abubakar;type=0